Coaching, Thoughts and Meditations – Mastering your Emotions

by | Jul 21, 2020 | League of Legends | 0 comments

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When coaching, you will  inexorably find yourself in stressful and unpredictable situations. Thus, it’s quite understandable how you would end up having to put your own feelings aside. As a coach, you have to be the most stable part of the team. You have to be the voice of absolute reason. The same isn’t quite true or necessary for the players, however.

 

In a competitive environment, emotions can be quite powerful. Anger, anxiety, excitement, and many more feelings are experienced by each player over the course of just one game. When talking to or observing players, one tends to focus on the negative. You see when the players “tilt” or being to fall in a slump, even in a single game. You notice small mistakes turn into larger ones, and it affects their mental state.

 

Be that as it may, there are also a plethora of strong positive emotions that can be experienced as well. Once a player or the team gets excited and gains their confidence, they often carry it throughout the game or even to the start of the next one. I believe that what’s most important for the players is not necessarily preventing themselves from succumbing to their emotions. What you have to do is to recognize them and know how to deal with these emotions on the fly. 

 

It’s quite difficult to take a pause and reflect in the middle of the game. With constant actions and reactions ongoing, one can very seldom find a respite from the frenetic pace of combat. Even naturally stoic or stonewalled players can get excited or tilted. I urge my players to follow their gut, because they know themselves the best. When coaching, I work in order to teach them and give them the tools to handle the needs of the game, and practice is built to constantly and relentlessly instill these values in them. 

 

By encouraging players to recognize their emotions and trust their instincts, I hope to help refine their split-second decision making. By drilling them through persistent and focused practice sessions, I hope to refine their thought processes. The final goal with this method is that in the end, instead of panicking, they start to be more careful. Instead of succumbing to their hubris when ahead, they start to focus on their strengths and push in that direction.

 

Mind games and misdirection are rampant throughout the game, frustrating fights and exciting exchanges are a constant, and hesitation could mean the difference between a win and a loss. Forcing players to expend their efforts trying to disregard their emotions often leads to them playing slower and being unable to react quickly and efficiently. Instead I want them to revel in their emotions and what they feel in the heat of the moment. Bottling up and ignoring their emotions can and often will lead to more problematic issues and outbursts in the future.

 

Coaching means acknowledging and playing into the team’s state of mind for an overall healthier and more stable environment. It’s important to trust your players and what they feel. This is tantamount to trusting their instincts, because their emotions drive their instincts. It’s the coach’s job to instill a certain degree of confidence in the players, so that they also trust themselves.

 

Check out the previous part of this series on coaching here.

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